How To: Install Performance Swaybars in 2010 Camaro - PlanetLSX
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How To: Install Performance Swaybars in 2010 Camaro

Writer: Tony Whatley, Photographer: Author

Posted at 8:31 PM / February 10, 2010

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Kick that body roll problem with a set of Pfadt swaybars.
Kick that body roll problem with a set of Pfadt swaybars.

Experience Level Required
Novice wrencher

Estimated Installation Time
1.5 hours without air tools

Tools Required
1/4 and 3/8 drive ratchets
7mm shallow socket
13mm deep socket or ratchet wrench
15mm ratchet wrench
5mm Allen wrench or socket
Floor jack & jackstands, or lift

For our latest round of 2010 Camaro modifications, we will install a set of Pfadt Sport Swaybars in our project 2010 Camaro SS. The portly size and heavy weight of the newest generation Camaro does little to help in terms of handing or steering response. Replacing the flimsy factory swaybars with a set of performance tuned ones will decrease body roll when cornering, and greatly improve steering response. A little bit of the plush ride quality is sacrificed when doing this modification, but the fun factor goes way up. The Camaro now feels more like a sportscar should, especially in the curves.

Installation Steps

Rear Suspension – The rear swaybar was a little easier to remove and install than the front one was, so lets tackle the easy stuff first. Our project car already had an aftermarket exhaust system installed, but we have reports that this installation is just as simple with the factory exhaust system intact. On our aftermarket exhaust system, we had to disconnect the two rubber exhaust hangars just behind the axle to pull down on the exhaust a bit to allow the swaybar to pass over it in certain areas.

1. Working on a level and solid surface, jack both sides of the rear of the vehicle up, and place vehicle on jackstands. It is never a good idea to do work with just a jack supporting the car, as jacks have been known to collapse. For the rear swaybar install, wheels do not need to be removed.

2. Disconnect the endlink bars on both ends of the swaybar. You will need a 15mm ratchet wrench to loosen the nut, and a 5mm allen wrench to keep the stud from turning.

3. Loosen and remove the four bolts (2 per side) which are securing the swaybar rubber bushing supports. This requires a 13mm socket or wrench. After this step, the rear swaybar is now disconnected from the car.

4. Carefully slide the factory swaybar out from either side of the car, working it over the exhaust system. If necessary, disconnect the two central rubber exhaust hangers just behind the rear axle and pry/pull down on the exhaust system to gain additional clearance.

5. Slide the Pfadt swaybar into place, just the opposite as the factory one was removed. Once the swaybar is in place, squirt some of the supplied assembly grease on the locations where the new polyurethane bushings will rest.

6. Slide the new polyurethane bushings over the ends of the swaybar and up into their final resting location. Install new Pfadt metal bushing supports over the top of them. Using the factory bolts and supplied washers to install the bushing supports. Leave them hand-tight for now.

7. Install the endlinks into the ends of the swaybar. There are three holes to pick from, resulting in three possible stiffness settings. The hole closest to the swaybar itself will be the stiffest setting, and the hole furthest on the tip will be less stiff. We chose the middle hole for now. These can be easily changed later to suit your driving needs. Tighten down the end link nuts with the 15mm wrench and a 5mm allen to keep the stud from spinning. Keep an eye on the dust boot located on that balljoint stud, make sure not to twist it while tightening the nut down.

8. Go back and tighten the four bolts on the rubber bushing supports. This requires a 13mm wrench or socket. Congrats! Your rear swaybar is now installed.

Front Suspension - The factory front swaybar is kind of comical to look at. It has some huge sweeping arcs, and almost looks like an afterthought on how it is arranged in the vehicle. It was just a tiny bit more tricky than the rear swaybar for removal, but we figured it out. Some guys bust out the sawzall and cut the factory swaybar in half to get it out, we simply removed a wheel. Your choice.

1. Working on a level and solid surface, jack both sides of the front of the vehicle up, and place vehicle on jackstands. It is never a good idea to do work with just a jack supporting the car, as jacks have been known to collapse. For the front swaybar install, the passenger side front wheel should be removed.

2. Disconnect the endlinks from the ends of the swaybar. This requires a 15mm ratchet wrench for the nut, and a 7mm socket to keep the stud from spinning.

3. Remove the four nuts (2 per side) that are securing the factory rubber bushing brackets to the frame. This requires a 13mm wrench or deep socket. The swaybar is now disconnected from the vehicle.

4. Carefully work the swaybar up and over the frame, out the passenger side of the vehicle. There are a series of rubber and aluminum tubes going to the radiator and steering rack, be careful not to snag any. With a little patience, you will be able to twist and shove the swaybar in small steps until it is free. Rubber hoses give a little, so don’t be afraid to push on them a bit to get more clearance. If you get scared, bust out the saw and cut the swaybar in half. Just don’t tell your buddies about it, they will question your wrenching skills.

5. Carefully slide the Pfadt swaybar up and over the frame, the opposite of how the factory one came out. Once in place, go ahead and put the globs of grease where the new polyurethane bushings will eventually come to rest.

6. Slide the Pfadt polyurethane bushings over the ends of the swaybars and to their final resting areas. Install the new metal bushing brackets, along with supplied washers and factory nuts. Leave them hand tight for now.

7. Install the endlinks into the ends of the swaybar. Use a 15mm ratchet wrench for the nut, and a 7mm socket to keep the stud from spinning. Keep an eye on the balljoint stud dust boot, being careful not to twist it while tightening the endlink.

8. Go back and tighten the four nuts on the swaybar bushing brackets, using a 13mm wrench or deep socket.

9. Reinstall the passenger front wheel. Congrats! Your new front swaybar is now installed.

Swaybar installation does not affect alignment, you are now cleared to go carve some corners!

For more product information, please visit PfadtRacing.com

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